Schedule

Registration and Coffee
(breakfast on your own)

Opening Remarks

Panel Session: 
Emotion Regulation Across Fields

Maya Tamir

Eran Halperin

Amelia Aldao

Coffee Break

Research Spotlights

Andero Uusberg

June Gruber

Ethan Kross

Alia Crum

Keynote Address

George Bonanno

Moderator: Ann Kring

Lunch 
Catered at nearby gastropub Bartlett Hall

Methods Spotlight:
Experience Sampling

Pete Koval

Moderator: Elise Kalokerinos

Coffee Break

Thematic Session: 
Interpersonal Emotion Regulation

Wendy Mendes

Shelly Gable

Amit Goldenberg

Jamil Zaki

Closing Remarks

8:30 –  9:00 AM 

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9:00 – 9:15  AM

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9:15  –  10:15 AM

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10:15 – 10:30 AM

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10:30 – 11:25 AM 

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11:25 – 12:25 PM

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12:30 – 1:30 PM

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1:45  –  2:30 PM

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2:30  – 2:45 PM

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2:45  –  3:45 PM

 

 

3:45 - 4:00 PM

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Speakers

Alia Crum

 

Alia J. Crum, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Stanford University and the Principle Investigator of the Stanford Mind & Body Lab. Dr. Crum’s research focuses on how changes in subjective mindsets — the core assumptions we make about things and processes in the world—can alter objective reality through behavioral, psychological, and physiological mechanisms. 

Amelia Aldao

 

Dr. Amelia Aldao, Ph.D., is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and Founder of Together CBT, a clinic specializing in group therapy for anxiety, OCD, stress, and depression in New York City. She is very passionate about science dissemination and helping people access evidence-based therapy, such as CBT.

Amit Goldenberg

 

Dr. Amit Goldenberg is an assistant professor at Harvard Business School (NOM) and a psychologist by training. His research is focused on understanding the unfolding and regulation of the emotional processes that shape group behavior.

Andero Uusberg

 

Andero Uusberg is a senior research fellow at the UT Institute of Psychology. Before starting this position in July of last year, Andero spent three years as a post-doc at Stanford. His research topics vary from regulation of emotions to time perception and mindfulness.

Ann Kring

Ann M. Kring, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, and former Director of the Clinical Science Program and Psychology Clinic. Her current research focus is on emotion and psychopathology, with a specific interest in the emotional features of schizophrenia, assessing negative symptoms in schizophrenia, and the linkage between cognition and emotion in schizophrenia. 

Elise Kalokerinos

Dr. Elise Kalokerinos is a Lecturer in the Ethics and Well-being Hub in the Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences at the University of Melbourne, Australia. Her primary line of research centers on emotion regulation. She focuses on how factors like context, timing, and goals can shape which strategies people choose to regulate their emotions, and how successful those strategies are both in the short term and in the long term.

Eran Halperin

Dr. Eran Halperin is currently a full professor of psychology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

His research uses psychological and political theories and methods to investigate different aspects of inter-group conflicts. More specifically, he is interested in widening the understanding regarding the psychological roots of some of the most destructive political ramifications of inter-group relations – e.g., intolerance, exclusion and inter-group violence and conflict.

Ethan Kross

Dr. Ethan Kross is a full psychology professor at the University of Michigan and runs the Emotion and Self-Control Lab. His work explores how people can control their emotions to improve our understanding of how self-control works and to discover ways of enhancing self-control in daily life. 

George Bonanno

George A. Bonanno, Ph.D. is a Professor of Clinical Psychology. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1991. His research and scholarly interests have centered on the question of how human beings cope with loss, trauma and other forms of extreme adversity, with an emphasis on resilience and the salutary role of flexible coping and emotion regulatory processes.

Jamil Zaki

Jamil Zaki is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Stanford University and the Director of the Stanford Social Neuroscience Lab. His research focuses on the cognitive and neural bases of social behavior, and in particular on how people understand each other's emotions (empathic accuracy), why they conform to each other (social influence), and why they choose to help each other (altruism).

June Gruber

Dr. June Gruber is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of Colorado, and Director of the Positive Emotion and Psychopathology Laboratory. Her research focuses on positive emotion disturbance, or the delineating the ways in which positive emotion can go awry and towards developing an integrated clinical affective science model of positive emotion disturbance.

Maya Tamir

Dr, Maya Tamir is a full professor of psychology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She is the director of the Emotion & Self-Regulation Laboratory. Her research focuses on whether and how people can benefit from their emotions, whether they try to use their emotions in ways that are helpful to them, and how they learn about the potential consequences of their emotions.

Pete Koval

Dr. Pete Koval is a senior lecturer in psychology at the Melbourne School Of Psychological Sciences. His research focuses on emotion dynamics in daily life,  emotional inertia, the relationship between emotion dynamics and psychological well-being, and depression.

Shelly Gable

Dr. Shelly Gable is an Assistant Professor at UCLA where she earned tenure and co-founded the Interdisciplinary Relationship Science Program before joining the faculty at UCSB. Dr. Gable’s research focuses on motivation, close relationships, and positive emotions. 

Wendy Mendes

Dr. Mendes is the Sarlo/Ekman Professor of Emotion at UC San Francisco. Her research questions sit at the intersection of social, personality, and biological psychology and primarily concerns questions regarding embodiment: how emotions, thoughts, and intentions are experienced in the body and how bodily responses shape and influence thoughts, behaviors, and emotions. 

Organizers

Faculty

Brett Ford

Brett is an assistant professor in the psychology department at the University of Toronto and the director of the Affective Science & Health Laboratory. She completed her doctoral training in social-personality from the University of California, Berkeley. Brett’s research uses multi-method and interdisciplinary approaches to examine the structure of emotion beliefs and emotion regulation strategies, the cultural, biological, and psychological factors that shape these beliefs and strategies, and the implications of these beliefs and strategies for health and well-being.

James Gross

James Gross is a professor of psychology at Stanford, the director of the Stanford Psychology One Program, and the director of the Stanford Psychophysiology Laboratory. He completed his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on emotion and emotion regulation and uses both experimental and individual difference methods.

Maital Neta

Maital Neta is an associate professor of psychology at University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the Associate Director of the Center for Brain, Behavior, and Biology. She examines individual differences in response to emotional ambiguity. Specifically, although some expressions provide clear predictive information that something good (e.g., happy) or bad (e.g., angry) will happen, other expressions, like surprise, have predicted both positive (e.g., birthday party) and negative (e.g., car accident) events for us in the past. 

Gal Sheppes

Gal Sheppes is an associate professor of psychology, the head of the clinical psychology graduate program, and the director of the Emotion and Self-Regulation Laboratory in Tel Aviv University. Gal received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Ben-Gurion University in Israel. In his studies, he integrates basic and applied science in order to study the underlying mechanisms of emotion regulation and self-regulation among healthy and clinical populations. He incorporates experiential, behavioral and electrophysiological methods. 

Organizers

Student

Nick Harp

Nick’s research focuses on understanding individual differences in emotional biases through the use of both psychological and neurobiological methods. Additionally, he aims to understand how behavioral interventions (e.g., exercise, mindfulness-based stress reduction) can bring about changes in regulatory behavior and ultimately shift emotional biases.

Arasteh Gatchpazian

Arasteh is a first year Ph.D student in Social/Personality psychology at the University of Toronto. Her primary research interests focus on emotion beliefs in the context of decision-making and how emotion-regulation is related to well-being. 

Angela Smith

Angela is a Ph.D student in Social/Personality psychology at the University of Toronto. Her research interests include the ways in which emotion and emotion regulation are influenced by socioeconomic and cultural factors, and how that in turn influences physical and psychological health.  

Jinxiao Zhang

Jinxiao Zhang is a 2nd-year PhD student working with James Gross at Stanford. He is interested in the interplay between sleep and emotion as well as the neural mechanisms of cognition interfacing with emotion (e.g. emotion regulation).

 

Photos from the Inaugural 2019 Emotion Regulation Preconference

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